Αγορά Πολιτών

Τρόπος Συμμετοχής

Χορηγίες

Πολίτες στην Αγορά

Έχουμε 619 επισκέπτες συνδεδεμένους

Επικοινωνία

Location: Berlin, Germany

Viber +41762833777

Citizen Band Radio:

- Call-channel: 1 FM (frequency modulation)

- Call-sign: EB-1142

A Greek Government In Exile

  

Greek Dissidents Political Persecution



 

60+ Trillion Euros Dispute for Greece's Minerals



 

21/06/2020 International Protests

 

Robbed at Copenhagen

 

George Bobolas

 

Prespes-Agreement Superimposed-Reality Ruthless-Propaganda

 

 

 

 

Mielke - Chrisochoidis

 

O/L to British P/M

 

O/L to E. Macron

 

Accountability-Free Genocides

 

Militarized "psychiatry"

 

The Absolute Evil

 

Gang-stalking Greeks

 

Byzantine Atrocities

 

European Dissidents ALARM

 

Human Rights' Court

 

The used up men

 

Dissidents - USG RICO crimes

 

Open Letter to Theresa May

 

Open Letter to António Guterres UN's SG

 

Triangulation - Zersetzen

 

Open Letter to Andrew Parker, MI5

  

Πράξεις ποταπές - Despicable choices

 

 

My father's death

 

Cavitation damage

 

Burglary and vandalism

 

Dry mini submarine

 

Message to Bundeswehr 2

 

Message to Bundeswehr 1

 

“Tough” guys and TOUGH guys

 

Μοναδική λύση, το Χόλιγουντ

 

Charlatans

 

Zeppelin: Beyond Gravity

 

Foreign intervention in Greece?

 

Η ανελεύθερη Ελλάδα

 

Η Ελλάδα καταγώγιο;

 

Αν.Επ. Π. Παυλόπουλο

  

Intangible prisons

 

Plausible deniability

 

Images of German w & s

 

Crimes against Humanity

 

"Chimera" - "Bellerophon"

 

pr. Donald Trump

 

  

Legal Notice 87

 

Βδέλλες, αποικιοκρατικές

 

Being a German

 

Legal Notice 84

 

Dirty colonial methods

 

Georgi Markov, BG - KGB

 

Samples of Barbarity

 

Ελλάδα - αποκόλληση

 

Έλληνες, στο έλεος...

 

Harvester's log 16/3/17

 

 

Legal Notice 66

 

Execrable

 

Legal Notice 62

 

  

My story

 

  

Aggression?

 

  

Η Εστία μου

 

  

Why so untidy?

 

  

Αποικιοκρατία

 

  

Εξόντωση Ελλήνων αντιφρονούντων;

 

  

Ζήτημα εμπιστοσύνης

 

  

Μεθοδικότητα

 

  

Ανοικτή Επιστολή πρέσβη ΗΠΑ

Αφορμή, U2RIT vs Ελλάδα;

Βιοηθική

A request to U2RIT

Colonial aggression - 2

Open Letter to UN S.G.

Open Letter to p.C. & p. O.

Δήλωση πρόθεσης επαναπατρισμού

 

Ο "εφιάλτης" της Νυρεμβέργης

Συλλογή Φωτογραφιών

Αίτημα προστασίας, προς Ιταλία

Chroma key, background removal

Science and Ethics

Να συμβάλει και η U2RIT

Θα ξαναφτιάξουν πολλές φορές Άουσβιτς και Zyclon B

 

Split-Screen effect

Η Ζωή είναι Ωραία.

Βόρεια Κορέα

Λευτεριά στους Έλληνες, εξανα- γκαστικά "Εξαφανισμένους"

 

Μυστικές δίκες;

Trustworthiness

Πολιτισμό, ή, απληστία;

Ακραία Στυγνότητα

Η Τέχνη της Επιβίωσης

Political Asylum 3

Επιστροφή στις ρίζες

The Human Cost of Torture

An urgent appeal for solidarity

More obvious than the Sun

Western "culture"

Political Asylum

Έννομη Προστασία

Μια μήνυση που εγείρει ερωτηματικά

 

 

 

Honor your father...

Noise

Creative Greeks

A pair of Dictatorships

British Settler-Colonialism’s Most Crucial Competency PDF Εκτύπωση E-mail
Αξιολόγηση Χρήστη: / 0
ΧείριστοΆριστο 
Συνεννόηση για Δράση - Απόψεις
Συντάχθηκε απο τον/την Χρήστος Μπούμπουλης (Christos Boumpoulis)   
Τετάρτη, 15 Απρίλιος 2020 15:16

A Clockwork Orange (1975) Official Trailer - Stanley Kubrick Movie

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPRzm8ibDQ8

THE BRITISH MURDER OF TASMANIA

www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hvnOfQTTnU

Chapter 6   Soviet Psychiatry

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLz_DqDyHxM

British Settler-Colonialism’s Most Crucial Competency

The contemporary British settler-colonialism does not employ the overtly atrocious violence, like those against the Tasmanians, for progressing. Instead, it employs, equally atrocious violence, though which complies to the “plausible deniability” principle.
The most crucial, from the British perspective, such covert violence seems to be, the British long-tradition of slandering as allegedly “crazy” whoever manifests any kind of resistance against the British settler-colonialism.
For example, right now, the Greek so-called “mental institutions” are mostly flooded with sane, intelligent, civilized and patriotic citizens which have been slandered by the dictatorial political regime as being allegedly “crazy”, for many criminal reasons including the necessity for the colonizing-settlers to occupy Greece’s political and social institutions in order to enforce a dictatorship.
The method for incarcerating sane citizens into so-called “mental institutions” is the following:
- the victim is being videotaped while, in social surroundings, responds naturally to existing and methodized through “street-theatre” (is a part of the death-program “gang-stalking”), external stimuli. Then, adulterated, by video-editing where the view of the external stimuli have been removed, versions of the video-recordings are being presented to the corrupted part of the social-institutions (e.g. justice, security-authorities, armed-forces, medical-domain, etc.) which designates the unsuspected and sane citizen as being allegedly “mentally-ill” and enforces unconstitutional laws in order for locking-up the victims in “mental-institutions”. Simultaneously, directed-energy (microwave)/chemical (MKUltra, etc.)/biological weapons and forged-witnesses may pave the victims’ way towards their extermination within the “mental-institutions”.
According to vast, existing in the Internet, reliable information and named testimonies, the Europe’s most part has been migrated by “drugged and maddened from opiates beforehand” criminals, meaning the “organic-portals” which, in order to promote their colonial “masters’ ” illegitimate interests, they spend their days in the European streets for perpetrating criminal gang-stalking against “targeted”, by the colonizers, lawful and innocent citizens. Among other intended criminal goals, of the Zersetzen-torture’s modern version, is to slander sane citizens as “crazy”.
Concluding, this British-atrocity it would had been highly unlike to manifest in case where the citizens they hadn’t, collectively indirectly, declined from their human-rights through the usage, of the digital, mobile and landline’s, telephony and of the current, unsafe form of the Internet.

Christos Boumpoulis
economist

Appendix

A Clockwork Orange (film)
A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film adapted, produced, and directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on Anthony Burgess's novel A Clockwork Orange. It employs disturbing, violent images to comment on psychiatry, juvenile delinquency, youth gangs, and other social, political, and economic subjects in a dystopian near-future Britain.
Alex (Malcolm McDowell), the central character, is a charismatic, antisocial delinquent whose interests include classical music (especially Beethoven), committing rape, theft and what is termed "ultra-violence". He leads a small gang of thugs, Pete (Michael Tarn), Georgie (James Marcus), and Dim (Warren Clarke), whom he calls his droogs (from the Russian word друг, "friend", "buddy"). The film chronicles the horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture, and attempted rehabilitation via an experimental psychological conditioning technique (the "Ludovico Technique") promoted by the Minister of the Interior (Anthony Sharp). Alex narrates most of the film in Nadsat, a fractured adolescent slang composed of Slavic (especially Russian), English, and Cockney rhyming slang.
The soundtrack to A Clockwork Orange features mostly classical music selections and Moog synthesizer compositions by Wendy Carlos. The artwork for the poster of A Clockwork Orange was created by Philip Castle with the layout by designer Bill Gold.
Morality
The film's central moral question (as in many of Burgess's novels) is the definition of "goodness" and whether it makes sense to use aversion therapy to stop immoral behaviour.[5] Stanley Kubrick, writing in Saturday Review, described the film as:
“    A social satire dealing with the question of whether behavioural psychology and psychological conditioning are dangerous new weapons for a totalitarian government to use to impose vast controls on its citizens and turn them into little more than robots."[6]    ”
Similarly, on the film production's call sheet (cited at greater length above), Kubrick wrote:
“    "It is a story of the dubious redemption of a teenage delinquent by condition-reflex therapy. It is, at the same time, a running lecture on free-will.    ”
After aversion therapy, Alex behaves like a good member of society, though not through choice. His goodness is involuntary; he has become the titular clockwork orange—organic on the outside, mechanical on the inside. After Alex has undergone the Ludovico technique, the chaplain criticises his new attitude as false, arguing that true goodness must come from within. This leads to the theme of abusing liberties—personal, governmental, civil—by Alex, with two conflicting political forces, the Government and the Dissidents, both manipulating Alex purely for their own political ends.[7] The story portrays the "conservative" and "liberal" parties as equally worthy of criticism: the writer Frank Alexander, a victim of Alex and his gang, wants revenge against Alex and sees him as a means of definitively turning the populace against the incumbent government and its new regime. Mr Alexander fears the new government; in a telephone conversation, he says:
“    Recruiting brutal young roughs into the police; proposing debilitating and will-sapping techniques of conditioning. Oh, we've seen it all before in other countries; the thin end of the wedge! Before we know where we are, we shall have the full apparatus of totalitarianism.    ”
On the other side, the Minister of the Interior (the Government) jails Mr Alexander (the Dissident Intellectual) on the excuse of his endangering Alex (the People), rather than the government's totalitarian regime (described by Mr Alexander). It is unclear whether or not he has been harmed; however, the Minister tells Alex that the writer has been denied the ability to write and produce "subversive" material that is critical of the incumbent government and meant to provoke political unrest.
Another target of criticism is the behaviourism or "behavioural psychology" propounded by psychologists John B. Watson and B. F. Skinner. Burgess disapproved of behaviourism, calling Skinner's book Beyond Freedom and Dignity (1971) "one of the most dangerous books ever written". Although behaviourism's limitations were conceded by its principal founder, Watson, Skinner argued that behaviour modification—specifically, operant conditioning (learned behaviours via systematic reward-and-punishment techniques) rather than the "classical" Watsonian conditioning—is the key to an ideal society. The film's Ludovico technique is widely perceived as a parody of aversion therapy, which is a form of classical conditioning.[8]
Author Paul Duncan said of Alex: "Alex is the narrator so we see everything from his point of view, including his mental images. The implication is that all of the images, both real and imagined, are part of Alex's fantasies".[9] Psychiatrist Aaron Stern, the former head of the MPAA rating board, believed that Alex represents man in his natural state, the unconscious mind. Alex becomes "civilised" after receiving his Ludovico "cure" and the sickness in the aftermath Stern considered to be the "neurosis imposed by society".[10] Kubrick told film critics Philip Strick and Penelope Houston that he believed Alex "makes no attempt to deceive himself or the audience as to his total corruption or wickedness. He is the very personification of evil. On the other hand, he has winning qualities: his total candour, his wit, his intelligence and his energy; these are attractive qualities and ones, which I might add, which he shares with Richard III".
British withdrawal
Although it was passed uncut for UK cinemas in December 1971, British authorities considered the sexual violence in the film to be extreme. In March 1972, during the trial of a 14-year-old male accused of the manslaughter of a classmate, the prosecutor referred to A Clockwork Orange, suggesting that the film had a macabre relevance to the case.[38] The film was also linked to the murder of an elderly vagrant by a 16-year-old boy in Bletchley, Buckinghamshire, who pleaded guilty after telling police that friends had told him of the film "and the beating up of an old boy like this one". Roger Gray QC, for the defence, told the court that "the link between this crime and sensational literature, particularly A Clockwork Orange, is established beyond reasonable doubt".[39] The press also blamed the film for a rape in which the attackers sang "Singin' in the Rain" as "Singin' in the Rape".[40] Christiane Kubrick, the director's wife, has said that the family received threats and had protesters outside their home.[41]
The film was withdrawn from British release in 1973 by Warner Brothers at the request of Kubrick.[42] In response to allegations that the film was responsible for copycat violence Kubrick stated:
To try and fasten any responsibility on art as the cause of life seems to me to put the case the wrong way around. Art consists of reshaping life, but it does not create life, nor cause life. Furthermore, to attribute powerful suggestive qualities to a film is at odds with the scientifically accepted view that, even after deep hypnosis in a posthypnotic state, people cannot be made to do things which are at odds with their natures.[43]
The Scala Cinema Club went into receivership in 1993 after losing a legal battle following an unauthorised screening of the film.[44] In the same year, Channel 4 broadcast Forbidden Fruit, a 27-minute documentary about the withdrawal of the film in Britain.[45] It contains footage from A Clockwork Orange. It was difficult to see A Clockwork Orange in the United Kingdom for 27 years. It was only after Kubrick died in 1999 that the film was theatrically re-released and made available on VHS and DVD. On 4 July 2001, the uncut version premiered on Sky TV's Sky Box Office, where it ran until mid-September.
Censorship in other countries
In Ireland, the film was banned on 10 April 1973. Warner Bros. decided against appealing the decision. Eventually, the film was passed uncut for cinema on 13 December 1999 and released on 17 March 2000.[46][47][48] The re-release poster, a replica of the original British version, was rejected due to the words "ultra-violence" and "rape" in the tagline. Sheamus Smith explained his rejection to the Irish Times:
“    I believe that the use of those words in the context of advertising would be offensive and inappropriate.[49]    ”
In Singapore, the film was banned for over 30 years, before an attempt at release was made in 2006. However, the submission for a M18 rating was rejected, and the ban was not lifted.[50] The ban was later lifted and the film was shown uncut (with an R21 rating) on 28 October 2011, as part of the Perspectives Film Festival.[51][52]
In South Africa, it was banned under the apartheid regime for 13 years, then in 1984 was released with one cut and only made available to people over the age of 21.[53] It was banned in South Korea[50] and in the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Nova Scotia.[54] Alberta reversed the ban upon Kubrick's death in 1999. The Maritime Film Classification Board also reversed the ban eventually. Both jurisdictions now grant an R rating to the film.
Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Clockwork_Orange_(film)

Message Berlin 15/04/2020

www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkZMdm3qr2M
Τελευταία Ενημέρωση στις Τετάρτη, 15 Απρίλιος 2020 15:22