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European Dissidents ALARM

 

Human Rights' Court

 

The used up men

 

Dissidents - USG RICO crimes

 

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Triangulation - Zersetzen

 

Open Letter to Andrew Parker, MI5

  

Πράξεις ποταπές - Despicable choices

 

 

My father's death

 

Cavitation damage

 

Burglary and vandalism

 

Dry mini submarine

 

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“Tough” guys and TOUGH guys

 

Μοναδική λύση, το Χόλιγουντ

 

Charlatans

 

Zeppelin: Beyond Gravity

 

Foreign intervention in Greece?

 

Η ανελεύθερη Ελλάδα

 

Η Ελλάδα καταγώγιο;

 

Αν.Επ. Π. Παυλόπουλο

  

Intangible prisons

 

Plausible deniability

 

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Crimes against Humanity

 

"Chimera" - "Bellerophon"

 

pr. Donald Trump

 

  

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Βδέλλες, αποικιοκρατικές

 

Being a German

 

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Dirty colonial methods

 

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Split-Screen effect

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The Human Cost of Torture

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More obvious than the Sun

Western "culture"

Political Asylum

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Μια μήνυση που εγείρει ερωτηματικά

 

 

 

Honor your father...

Noise

Creative Greeks

A pair of Dictatorships

Gang-Stalking and Public Humiliation PDF Εκτύπωση E-mail
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Συντάχθηκε απο τον/την Χρήστος Μπούμπουλης (Christos Boumpoulis)   
Παρασκευή, 09 Αύγουστος 2019 16:35

Things Perpetrators Say

www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyxKa0gI4yU

 

Gang-Stalking and Public Humiliation

 

Organized stalking

“Organized Stalking is a form of terrorism used against an individual in a malicious attempt to reduce the quality of a persons life so they will: have a nervous break-down, become incarcerated, institutionalized, experience constant mental, emotional, or physical pain, become homeless, and/or

commit suicide. This is done using well-orchestrated accusations, lies, rumors, bogus investigations, setups, framings, intimidation, overt or covert threats, vandalism, thefts, sabotage, torture, humiliation, emotional terror and general harassment. It is a “ganging up” by members of the community who follow an organizer and participate in a systematic “terrorizing” of an individual.”

-Mark M. Rich

Source: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=organized%20stalking

 

Public humiliation

Public humiliation or public shaming is a form of punishment whose main feature is dishonoring or disgracing a person, usually an offender or a prisoner, especially in a public place. It was regularly used as a form of judicially sanctioned punishment in previous centuries, and is still practiced by different means in the modern era.

In the United States, it was a common punishment from the beginning of European colonization through the 19th century. It fell out of common use in the 20th century, though it has seen a revival starting in the 1990s.

Shameful exposure

Public humiliation exists in many forms. In general, a criminal sentenced to one of the many forms of this punishment could expect to be placed in a central, public, or open place so that his fellow citizens could easily witness the sentence and, occasionally, participate in it as a form of "mob justice".

The punishment of public humiliation has taken many forms, ranging from an offender being forced to relate his crime, to a 'shame flute' (for untalented musicians), to the wearing of conspicuous clothing or jewelry (such as an oversized rosary (Dutch: schandstenen, "stones of shame") for someone late to church). The offender could alternatively be sentenced to remain exposed in a specific exposed place, in a restraining device such as a yoke or public stocks.

In the Low Countries, the schandstoel ("Chair of shame"), the kaak or schandpaal ("pole of shame", a simple type of pillory), the draaikooi were customary for adulteresses, and the schopstoel, a scaffolding from which one is kicked off to land in mud and dirt.

In the more extreme cases, being subjected to verbal and physical abuse from the crowd could have serious consequences, especially when the hands were bound, preventing self-protection. Some sentences actually prescribed additional humiliation, such as shaving, or would combine it with painful corporal punishments, see below.

Man and woman undergoing public exposure for adultery in Japan, circa 1860.

In Colonial America, common forms of public humiliation were the stocks and pillory, imported from Europe. Nearly every sizable town had such instruments of public humiliation, usually at the town square. In pre–World War Japan, adulterers were publicly exposed purely to shame them.

In post-Colonial times, judicial use of public humiliation punishment has largely fallen out of favor since the practice is now considered cruel and unusual punishment, which is officially outlawed by the United States Constitution.[3]:501

In Liberia, boy soldiers stripped civilian women to humiliate them; this was described with the verb phrase "to naked someone else."[4]

In Siam, an adulteress was paraded with a hibiscus behind the ear. Thieves were tattooed on their faces. Other criminals were paraded with a device made of woven cane on the forehead, or lengths of bamboo hung around the neck. Errant Brahmans had to wear a string of oversize beads.

Just like painful forms of corporal punishment, it has parallels in educational and other rather private punishments (but with some audience), in school or domestic disciplinary context, and as a rite of passage. Physical forms include being forced to wear some sign such as "donkey ears" (simulated in paper, as a sign one is—or at least behaved—proverbially stupid), wearing a dunce cap, having to stand, kneel or bend over in a corner, or repeatedly write something on a blackboard ("I will not spread rumors", for example). Here different levels of physical discomfort can be added, such as having to hold heavy objects, go barefoot (see below) or kneel on an uneven surface. Like physical punishment and harsh hazing, these have become controversial in most modern societies, in many cases leading to legal restrictions and/or (sometimes voluntary) abolishment.

Black-and-white photograph of two women with shaved heads and blank expressions on their face walking down a street in Paris. The women are surrounded by a group of other people, most of whom are smiling.

Paris 1944: French women accused of collaboration with Nazis had their heads shaved and were paraded through the streets barefoot.

Head shaving can be a humiliating punishment prescribed in law,[5] but also something done as "mob justice" - a stark example of which was the thousands of European women who had their heads shaved in front of cheering crowds in the wake of World War II,[6][7] as punishment for associating with occupying Nazis during the war.

Modern era slaves typically had to go barefoot by regulation in slave codes (colonial United States, 1780s).

Forcing people to go barefoot has been used as a relatively effortless and more subtle form of humiliation in most past and present civilized cultures, primarily using the visual contrast to the standard form of appearance while also creating some level of physical discomfort. The exposure of bare feet often served as an indicator for imprisonment and slavery throughout ancient as well as modern history.[8] Even today prisoners officially have to go barefoot in many countries of the world and are also presented in court and showcased to the public unshod. As shoes are commonly worn by all social classes since antiquity in most civilized societies, showcasing a captive to the public in bare feet traditionally symbolizes the person's loss of social standing and personal autonomy. It usually also causes a considerable degree of humiliation, as this noticeable detail typically sets the prisoner apart from spectators visually and demonstrates the person's vulnerability and general powerlessness.

Further means of public humiliation and degradation consist in forcing people to wear typifying clothes, which can be penitential garbs or prison uniforms.

Presenting arrestees or prisoners to the public in restraints (such as handcuffs, shackles or similar devices) also serves as a convenient[how?] method of public humiliation besides the primary security aspects. The effect is complemented by presenting the person in a prison uniform or similar clothing.

Corporal punishment

Public foot whipping in Iran

Public flagellation in Russia, 18th century.

Public flogging in Brazil, Jean-Baptiste Debret

Apart from specific methods essentially aiming at humiliation, several methods combine pain and humiliation or even death and humiliation. In some cases, the pain - or at least discomfort - is insignificant or rather secondary to the humiliation.

Public punishment

The simplest is to administer painful corporal punishment in public - the major aim may be deterrence of potential offenders - so the public will witness the perpetrator's fear and agony. This can either take place in a town square or other public gathering location such as a school, or take the form of a procession through the streets. This was not uncommon in the sentences to Staupenschlag (flagellation by whipping or birching, generally on the bare buttocks) in various German-speaking states, till the 19th century. A naval equivalent was Flogging round the fleet on a raft taken from ship to ship for consecutive installments of a great total of lashes, that could even be lethal. In some countries the punishment of foot whipping is executed in public to this day.

The humiliation as well as degradation is generally intensified if the perpetrator is unclothed (partially or entirely) as the exposure leaves the person feeling vulnerable and helpless. A common and simple form of humiliating exposure consists in taking away a person's shoes and keeping the prisoner barefoot during corporal punishment or generally.

Further means of intensifying the public humiliation and degradation especially during punishment consist in forcing people to wear typifying clothes, which can be prison uniforms or in former times penitential garbs or rags, further incremented in combination with an exposure aspect such as bare feet.

Even when not strictly public, humiliation can still be a psychologically "painful" aspect of punishment because of the presence of witnessing peers (such as fellow prisoners), staff, or other onlookers, or simply because the person administering the punishment is witnessing the reactions of the culprit. The loss of self-control in the presence of bystanders further increments the humiliating effect of the punishment significantly. This is also true for punishments in class and similar situations.

Crucifixion was used by the Romans to add public humiliation to a death penalty. Josephus describes how the Roman soldiers would crucify people naked, and using different tortuous positions as a way to further humiliate them. Crucified bodies were left to decay on the cross for weeks, and crows would come to feed on the corpses; this can be seen as post-mortem public humiliation. See also gibbeting.

Public shaving was also applied to (true or alleged) collaborators after the Allied liberated occupied territories from the Nazi troops;[6][7] being thus marked, they would remain in danger from molestation.[citation needed]

Torture marks

The 1774 tarring and feathering of British customs agent John Malcolm soon after the Boston Tea Party.

The humiliation can be extended; intentionally or not; by leaving visible marks, such as scars, notably on body parts that are normally left visible. This also serves as a virtually indelible criminal record. This can even be the main intention of the punishment, as in the case of scarifications, such as human branding. It invariably is essential in forms of mutilation, such as ear cropping, though the functional loss is even greater; pain may even be intentionally minimized as in the case of surgical amputation, eliminating the risk of accidental death. Tarring and feathering also serves as means of extended humiliation.

Psychological effects

Main article: Humiliation § Psychological effects

Public shaming can result in negative psychological effects and devastating consequences, regardless of the punishment being justifiable or not. It could cause depression, suicidal thoughts and other severe mental problems. The humiliated individuals may develop a variety of symptoms including apathy, paranoia, anxiety, PTSD, or others. The rage and fury may arise in the persecuted individual, themselves lashing out against innocent victims, as they seek revenge or as a means of release.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_humiliation

 

Gang Stalking in General

The effect the Stasi aimed at with these measure was the destruction of the targeted person's self-confidence by creating shame-saturated events and/or the erosion of this person's authority in the eyes of other network members, thus ultimately destroying the operability of the network by depriving it of nodal figures." (p. 498)

Source: http://www.individucible.com/gang_stalking_in_general.html

 

STALKING NIGHTMARE

At the same time, this group tried to isolate me within the company. They were trying to humiliate me, control me, harass me, single me out, manipulate me and change my thought process.

Source: https://stalkingnightmare.wordpress.com/about/

 

psychological warfare

the use of propaganda, threats, and other psychological techniques to mislead, intimidate, demoralize, or otherwise influence the thinking or behavior of an opponent.

Source:https://www.dictionary.com/browse/psychological-warfare

 

Psychological torture

Psychological torture is a type of torture that relies primarily on psychological effects, and only secondarily on any physical harm inflicted. Although not all psychological torture involves the use of physical violence, there is a continuum between psychological torture and physical torture. The two are often used in conjunction with one another, and often overlap in practice, with the fear and pain induced by physical torture often resulting in long-term psychological effects, and many forms of psychological torture involving some form of pain or coercion.

The Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (commonly known as the United Nations Convention against Torture) is an international human rights treaty, under the review of the United Nations, that aims to prevent torture and other acts of cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment around the world. The Convention requires states to take effective measures to prevent torture in any state under their jurisdiction, and forbids states to transport people to any country where there is reason to believe torture could occur.[1]

The text of the Convention was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 10 December 1984[2] and, following ratification by the 20th state party, it came into force on 26 June 1987. 26 June is now recognized as the International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, in honor of the Convention. As of May 2015, the Convention has 158 state parties.

The Convention gave for the first time in history a definition of psychological torture:

Torture is any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has committed or is suspected of having committed, or intimidating or coercing him or a third person, or for any reason based on discrimination of any kind, when such pain or suffering is inflicted by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official capacity.[3]

The Optional Protocol to such Convention (OPCAT, 2006) is an important addition to the United Nations Convention. The Committee Against Torture (CAT) is a body of independent experts that monitors implementation of the Convention by State parties. All State parties are obliged under the Convention to submit regular reports to the CAT on how the rights are being implemented. Upon ratifying the Convention, States must submit a report within one year, after which they are obliged to report every four years. The Committee examines each report and addresses its concerns and recommendations to the State party in the form of "concluding observations". Under certain circumstances, the CAT may consider complaints or communications from individuals claiming that their rights under the Convention have been violated. The CAT usually meets in May and November each year in Geneva.

Many forms of psychological torture methods attempt to destroy the subject's normal self-image by removing them from any kind of control over their environment, creating a state of learned helplessness, psychological regression and depersonalization. Other techniques include forced nudity and head shaving, sleep deprivation, hooding and other forms of sensory deprivation.

A strictly fear-inducing method is the mock execution. Various threats operate on the same fear-inducing principle.

Another method is indirect torture, in which a victim is forced to witness the torture of another person, often a loved one. This preys on the victim's affection for and loyalty to a partner, relative, friend, comrade-in-arms etc, whose real pain induces vicarious suffering in the targeted psychological victim, who is thus loaded with guilt but spared physical harm that might affect his or her ability to comply.

While psychological torture may not leave any lasting physical damage—indeed, this is often one of the motivations for using psychological rather than physical torture—it can result in similar levels of permanent mental damage to its victims.

It has been alleged that some psychological torture methods may have been devised by, or in conjunction with, doctors and psychologists.

The United States has been accused of making extensive use of psychological torture techniques at Guantanamo Bay and other sites subsequent to the 9/11 attacks. Many other countries have been accused of using psychological torture, including Iran. In 1976 the European Commission of Human Rights found the British government guilty of using psychological torture on IRA political detainees in Northern Ireland, while in 1978 the European Court of Human Rights found that the treatment of political internees constituted "inhuman and degrading treatment" rather than torture.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_torture

 

The contemporary settler-colonialism, according to undeniable historic evidence, in order to rob the land, the children and the future of the victimised Nations, employs, genocidal policies and “drugged and maddened with opiates beforehand” non-uniformed, settler-colonising armies.

The contemporary settler-colonising’s genocidal policies cause the death of millions of innocent civilians, through “plausibly deniable methods” (e.g. cancer, alzheimer, mass-poisoning, etc.) all around the world.

Relatively, very few people, according to available information over the Internet, realise these genocidal policies and simultaneously, manifest political defiance against the horror of settler-colonialism.

The settler-colonising Nations, traditionally, designate arbitrarily as “targeted individuals” these very few political dissidents.

The illegitimate and imoral methods which could and actually, are being used in order for the targeted, by the contemporary settler-colonialism, individuals to become destroyed are, literary, innumerable.

As far as, according to my opinion, the members of the international community desert the contemporary political dissidents to the settler-colonisers’ ruthlesness, then, many millions of these members, sadly, shall be destroyed, each year, by the settler-colonialism’s genocidal policies.

Concluding, I wish to ask from the reader to estimate, what chances, a legitimate and honest, patriotic indigenous member of any victimised Nation, actually has in effectively copeing with the barbaric force of the combination, of (MI5, CIA, FSM, Mossad, MIT) perpetrators, of methods (psychological warfare, behavior modification technics, Monarch-programming, street-theater, gang-stalking, etc.) and of technology (directed-energy weapons, claustrum-manipulating, RNM, electronic brain implants, chemical poisoning, telecommunications, etc.) while remaining totally deserted from its fellow citizens? The reader’s potential estimation, I believe that theoritically, it equally applies to its own, long term, escaping from the settler-colonisers’ genocidal policies.

 

Christos Boumpoulis

economist

 

P.S.: Despite how awkward might this sound and specifically under the current political circumstances, in Europe, I wouldn’t exclude the possibility that, a potential, public humilliation of any patriotic and legitimate, political dissident by members of the contemporary settler-colonising armies to, probably, be, in essence, an indirect and symbolic public honor for this political dissident.