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The Absolute Evil

 

Gang-stalking Greeks

 

Byzantine Atrocities

 

European Dissidents ALARM

 

Human Rights' Court

 

The used up men

 

Dissidents - USG RICO crimes

 

Open Letter to Theresa May

 

Open Letter to António Guterres UN's SG

 

Triangulation - Zersetzen

 

Open Letter to Andrew Parker, MI5

  

Πράξεις ποταπές - Despicable choices

 

 

My father's death

 

Cavitation damage

 

Burglary and vandalism

 

Dry mini submarine

 

Message to Bundeswehr 2

 

Message to Bundeswehr 1

 

“Tough” guys and TOUGH guys

 

Μοναδική λύση, το Χόλιγουντ

 

Charlatans

 

Zeppelin: Beyond Gravity

 

Foreign intervention in Greece?

 

Η ανελεύθερη Ελλάδα

 

Η Ελλάδα καταγώγιο;

 

Αν.Επ. Π. Παυλόπουλο

  

Intangible prisons

 

Plausible deniability

 

Images of German w & s

 

Crimes against Humanity

 

"Chimera" - "Bellerophon"

 

pr. Donald Trump

 

  

Legal Notice 87

 

Βδέλλες, αποικιοκρατικές

 

Being a German

 

Legal Notice 84

 

Dirty colonial methods

 

Georgi Markov, BG - KGB

 

Samples of Barbarity

 

Ελλάδα - αποκόλληση

 

Έλληνες, στο έλεος...

 

Harvester's log 16/3/17

 

 

Legal Notice 66

 

Execrable

 

Legal Notice 62

 

  

My story

 

  

Aggression?

 

  

Η Εστία μου

 

  

Why so untidy?

 

  

Αποικιοκρατία

 

  

Εξόντωση Ελλήνων αντιφρονούντων;

 

  

Ζήτημα εμπιστοσύνης

 

  

Μεθοδικότητα

 

  

Ανοικτή Επιστολή πρέσβη ΗΠΑ

Αφορμή, U2RIT vs Ελλάδα;

Βιοηθική

A request to U2RIT

Colonial aggression - 2

Open Letter to UN S.G.

Open Letter to p.C. & p. O.

Δήλωση πρόθεσης επαναπατρισμού

 

Ο "εφιάλτης" της Νυρεμβέργης

Συλλογή Φωτογραφιών

Αίτημα προστασίας, προς Ιταλία

Chroma key, background removal

Science and Ethics

Να συμβάλει και η U2RIT

Θα ξαναφτιάξουν πολλές φορές Άουσβιτς και Zyclon B

 

Split-Screen effect

Η Ζωή είναι Ωραία.

Βόρεια Κορέα

Λευτεριά στους Έλληνες, εξανα- γκαστικά "Εξαφανισμένους"

 

Μυστικές δίκες;

Trustworthiness

Πολιτισμό, ή, απληστία;

Ακραία Στυγνότητα

Η Τέχνη της Επιβίωσης

Political Asylum 3

Επιστροφή στις ρίζες

The Human Cost of Torture

An urgent appeal for solidarity

More obvious than the Sun

Western "culture"

Political Asylum

Έννομη Προστασία

Μια μήνυση που εγείρει ερωτηματικά

 

 

 

Honor your father...

Noise

Creative Greeks

A pair of Dictatorships

The vital consequences of a character’s weakness PDF Εκτύπωση E-mail
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Συντάχθηκε απο τον/την Χρήστος Μπούμπουλης (Christos Boumpoulis)   
Δευτέρα, 17 Σεπτέμβριος 2018 08:02

Alive (1993) VHS film trailer

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ly7DC2f8S6s


The vital consequences of a character’s weakness


Cannibalism: Survivor of the 1972 Andes plane crash describes the 'terrible' decision he had to make to stay alive


'I will never forget that first incision nine days after the crash'


Members of a Uruguayan rugby team survived the air crash in the Andes in 1972 by eating the frozen remains of those who had died


Four young men — freezing cold, starving and struggling to survive following a plane crash — stood over their dead friend, armed with razor blades and broken glass.

They cut their friend’s clothes.

Then, his body.

“I will never forget that first incision nine days after the crash,” Roberto Canessa recalls in his new book, “I Had to Survive.”

“We laid the thin strips of frozen flesh aside on a piece of sheet metal,” he writes, according to an adaptation in the Daily Mail. “Each of us finally consumed our piece when we could bear to.”

Surrounded by death following a 1972 Andes plane crash, the four men made the decision to live.

“Each of us came to our own decision in our own time,” Canessa writes. “And once we had done so, it was irreversible.

“It was our final goodbye to innocence.”

It was Friday the 13th of October in 1972 when an Uruguayan aircraft carrying the Old Christians rugby team and their friends and family went down in the mountains in Argentina, near the border with Chile.

After two months, 16 survivors were rescued and became the inspiration for numerous documentaries, movies and books — most notably the 1993 film “Alive,” which was based on a book by the same name.

Canessa was a 19-year-old medical student and rugby player at the time of the crash.

In his new book, which will be published March 1, he remembers haunting moments.

The one when the plane began to plummet and he held onto his seat with such strength that “I tore off chunks of fabric with my bare hands.” The one when an avalanche buried him, and his friend started “frantically digging handfuls of snow away from my mouth.” And the one when they heard over their transistor radio that the search for them had ended.

But, it seems, the descent into cannibalism was the hardest to endure.

In the Daily Mail adaptation, Canessa writes:

Our common goal was to survive — but what we lacked was food. We had long since run out of the meagre pickings we’d found on the plane, and there was no vegetation or animal life to be found. After just a few days we were feeling the sensation of our own bodies consuming themselves just to remain alive. Before long we would become too weak to recover from starvation.

We knew the answer, but it was too terrible to contemplate.

The bodies of our friends and team-mates, preserved outside in the snow and ice, contained vital, life-giving protein that could help us survive. But could we do it?

For a long time we agonised. I went out in the snow and prayed to God for guidance. Without His consent, I felt I would be violating the memory of my friends; that I would be stealing their souls.

We wondered whether we were going mad even to contemplate such a thing. Had we turned into brute savages? Or was this the only sane thing to do? Truly, we were pushing the limits of our fear.

Of the 45 passengers on the plane, 27 survived the crash.

Then, one night, which Canessa calls “the worst of my life,” an avalanche killed eight more.

“We had no food — even the frozen bodies we were relying on to stay alive had been swept away,” he writes, according to the Daily Mail. “Everyone was waiting for someone to do something. Or for no one to do anything and just let the end come.

“That’s when I steeled myself to do what needed to be done: to use one of the bodies of the newly dead.”

Canessa recalls that he had “already done things that I never in my darkest nightmares imagined I’d have to do” — and he knew he had to do them again.

“And so we took yet another step in the descent towards our ultimate indignity: to eat the body of the person lying next to us. Each of us would have to be stained with this blood if we were to keep the seed of life from withering.”

After a gut-wrenching 72 days on their own, the final 16 survivors were finally rescued on Dec. 23, 1972.

But Canessa said he agonized over what they had done and how others would feel about it.

He recently talked to People magazine about seeing his mother and father after he was saved.

“I told her, ‘Mother, we had to eat our dead friends,'” he told People, “and she said, ‘That’s okay, that’s okay, sweetie.’ ”

Canessa told his father that his main concern was how the victims’ families would react to the harsh reality.

“I said, ‘I don’t care,'” he told People, ‘”the only thing I want to do is go to the families of my friends who died and tell them what happened. I don’t expect them to understand but they should know what happened.’

“But thank God, people were very receptive and very supportive and they consider what we did something we had to do so everything went very smoothly.”

Canessa, now a pediatric cardiologist, said it was his family — and the determination to make it home to them — that gave him the strength to survive.

“In these kinds of situations,” he told People, “it’s not how you survive but why you survive.”


Source: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/cannibalism-andes-plane-crash-1972-survivors-terrible-decision-stay-alive-a6895781.html

 

Becoming very “powerful” is easy.

Becoming very “reach” is easy.

Becoming very “powerful” and very “reach” is easy.

 

Pharmacology has been one of the subjects that I have studied during my long presence in university libraries. According to my elementary knowledge on this subject, a medicine able to remove, from human experience, exclusively, the empathy, yet, does not exist. Without being certain, I believe that, the removal of empathy by medication is accompanied by the simultaneous, almost complete removal of all the emotions and shrinkage of the time-horizon to +/- 1 day; though I could be wrong.

 

The easiest method for, either, becoming very “powerful”, or, becoming very “reach”, is, bluntly, the ancient algorythm of the pimp; which is also named, entryism.

Normally, the human nature protects the human beings from resorting to this method through the homeostatic inner restrain of empathy.

Cohabitation without mutual trust is the definition of living in a jungle.

The things which are, currently, happening in Europe reveal the covert inhomogeneity between, the projected quality of civilization and the embeded one.

The colonizing Nations are, “powerful” and “reach”; we should take, this, for granted. But still, what we should, and what we should not, do about that?

Hypothetically:

- Should we satisfy even their immoral demands just to please them? And if yes, then, what?

The colonizers, from what it seems, pursue, an almost “immortality”; “flexible” identities; “obscure” ownership; and boudless “entertaiment”.

If we dare to, traumatize the “youth”; and, sacrifice the “guidance”; and restrict the “longtitude” of the human “inspiration” into a 2 days gap, then, what?

 

Christos Boumpoulis

economist

 

P.S.: Franz Stigler, my hero, remains a positive example of a strong and moral character.

 

Franz Stigler

 

Bf 109 pilot Franz Stigler and B 17 pilot Charlie Browns first meeting

www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaUxcKl6WgI


The Franz Stigler and Charlie Brown Incident

www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLjp9_Ws3J0


History from WWII - The Charlie Brown and Franz Stigler Incident

They met as enemies, but finished as friends

A pilot glanced outside his cockpit and froze. He blinked hard and looked again, hoping it was just a mirage. But his co-pilot stared at the same horrible vision. “My God, this is a nightmare,” the co-pilot said.”He’s going to destroy us,” the pilot agreed.

The men were looking at a gray German Messerschmitt fighter hovering just three feet off their wingtip. It was five days before Christmas 1943, and the fighter had closed in on their crippled American B-17 bomber for the kill.

The B-17 Pilot, Charles Brown, was a 21-year-old West Virginia farm boy on his first combat mission. His bomber had been shot to pieces by swarming fighters, and his plane was alone, struggling to stay in the skies above Germany. Half his crew was wounded, and the tail gunner was dead, his blood frozen in icicles over the machine guns.

But when Brown and his co-pilot, Spencer “Pinky” Luke, looked at the fighter pilot again, something odd happened. The German didn’t pull the trigger. He stared back at the bomber in amazement and respect. Instead of pressing the attack, he nodded at Brown and saluted. What happened next was one of the most remarkable acts of chivalry recorded during World War Il.

Stigler pressed his hand over the rosary he kept in his flight jacket.  He eased his index finger off the trigger. He couldn’t shoot. It would be murder. Stigler wasn’t just motivated by vengeance that day. He also lived by a code. He could trace his family’s ancestry to Knights in 16th century Europe. He had once studied to be a priest. A German pilot who spared the enemy, though, risked death in Nazi Germany. If someone reported him, he would be executed. Yet, Stigler could also hear the voice of his commanding officer, who once told him: “You follow the rules of war for you–not your enemy. You fight by rules to keep your humanity.”

Alone with the crippled bomber, Stigler changed his mission. He nodded at the American pilot and began flying in formation so German anti-aircraft gunners on the ground wouldn’t shoot down the slow-moving bomber. (The Luftwaffe had B-17’s of its own, shot down and rebuilt for secret missions and training.) Stigler escorted the bomber over the North Sea and took one last look at the American Pilot. Then he saluted him, peeled his fighter away, and returned to Germany.

“Good luck,” Stigler said to himself. “You’re in God’s hands now.” Franz Stigler didn’t think the big B-17 could make it back to England and wondered for years what happened to the American pilot and crew he encountered in combat.

As he watched the German fighter peel away that December day, 2nd Lt. Charles Brown wasn’t thinking of the philosophical connection between enemies. He was thinking of survival. He flew his crippled plane, filled with wounded, back to his base in England and landed with one of four engines knocked out, one failing, and barely any fuel left. After his bomber came to a stop, he leaned back in his chair and put a hand over a pocket Bible he kept in his flight jacket. Then he sat in silence.

Brown flew more missions before the war ended. Life moved on. He got married, had two daughters, supervised foreign aid for the U.S. State Department during the Vietnam War, and eventually retired to Florida.

Late in life, though, the encounter with the German Pilot began to gnaw at him. He started having nightmares, but in his dream there would be no act of mercy. He would awaken just before his bomber crashed.

Brown took on a new mission. He had to find that German Pilot. Who was he? Why did he save my life? He scoured Military Archives in the U.S. and England. He attended a Pilots’ Reunion and shared his story. He finally placed an ad in a German Newsletter for former Luftwaffe Pilots, retelling the story and asking if anyone knew the Pilot.

On January 18, 1990, Brown received a letter. He opened it and read:  “Dear Charles, All these years I wondered what happened to that B-17, did she make it home? Did her crew survive their wounds? To hear of your survival has filled me with indescribable joy.”

It was Stigler.

He had had left Germany after the war and moved to Vancouver, British Columbia in 1953. He became a prosperous  businessman. Now retired, Stigler told Brown that he would be in Florida come summer, and “it sure would be nice to talk about our encounter.” Brown was so excited, though, that he couldn’t wait to see Stigler. He called Directory Assistance for Vancouver and asked whether there was a number for a Franz Stigler. He dialed the number, and Stigler picked up.

“My God, it’s you!” Brown shouted as tears ran down his cheeks.

They met as enemies but Franz Stigler, on left, and Charles Brown, ended up as fishing buddies.

Brown and Stigler became pals. They would take fishing trips together. They would fly cross-country to each other homes and take road trips together to share their story at schools and veterans’ reunions. Their wives, Jackie Brown and Hiya Stigler, became friends.

Brown’s daughter says her father would worry about Stigler’s health and constantly check in on him. “It wasn’t just for show,” she says. “They really did feel for each other. They talked about once a week.”  As his friendship with Stigler deepened, something else happened to her father, Warner says “The nightmares went away.”

Brown had written a letter of thanks to Stigler, but one day he showed the extent of his gratitude. He organized a reunion of his surviving crew members along with their extended families. He invited Stigler as a Guest of Honor.

During the reunion, a video was played showing all the faces of the people that now lived–children, grandchildren, relatives–because of Stigler’s act of chivalry. Stigler watched the film from his Seat of Honor.

“Everybody was crying, not just him,” Warner says.

Stigler and Brown died within months of each other in 2008. Stigler was 92, and Brown was 87. They had started off as enemies, became friends, and then something more.

After he died, Warner was searching through Brown’s library when she came across a book on German fighter jets. Stigler had given the book to Brown.  Both were country boys who loved to read about planes.

Warner opened the book and saw an inscription Stigler had written to Brown:

In 1940, I lost my only brother as a night fighter. On the 20th of    December, 4 days before Christmas, I had the chance to save a   B-17 from her destruction, a plane so badly damaged, it was a wonder that she was still flying. The pilot, Charlie Brown, is for me as precious as my brother was. Thanks Charlie.

Your brother, Franz


Source: https://www.globalo.com/history-wwii-charlie-brown-franz-stigler-incident/



Note: The photo was found here,

http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/attachments/photos-papers-propaganda-third-reich/78100d1312773109t-franz-stigler-man-honor-scan0031.jpg


 

Τελευταία Ενημέρωση στις Δευτέρα, 17 Σεπτέμβριος 2018 09:18