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Images of German w & s

 

Crimes against Humanity

 

"Chimera" - "Bellerophon"

 

Legal Notice 87

 

Βδέλλες, αποικιοκρατικές

 

Being a German

 

Legal Notice 84

 

Dirty colonial methods

 

Georgi Markov, BG - KGB

 

Samples of Barbarity

 

Ελλάδα - αποκόλληση

 

Έλληνες, στο έλεος...

 

Harvester's log 16/3/17

 

 

Legal Notice 66

 

Execrable

 

Legal Notice 62

 

  

My story

 

  

Aggression?

 

  

Η Εστία μου

 

  

Why so untidy?

 

  

Αποικιοκρατία

 

  

Εξόντωση Ελλήνων αντιφρονούντων;

 

  

Ζήτημα εμπιστοσύνης

 

  

Μεθοδικότητα

 

  

Ανοικτή Επιστολή πρέσβη ΗΠΑ

Αφορμή, U2RIT vs Ελλάδα;

Βιοηθική

A request to U2RIT

Colonial aggression - 2

Open Letter to UN S.G.

Open Letter to p.C. & p. O.

Δήλωση πρόθεσης επαναπατρισμού

 

Ο "εφιάλτης" της Νυρεμβέργης

Συλλογή Φωτογραφιών

Αίτημα προστασίας, προς Ιταλία

Chroma key, background removal

Science and Ethics

Να συμβάλει και η U2RIT

Θα ξαναφτιάξουν πολλές φορές Άουσβιτς και Zyclon B

 

Split-Screen effect

Η Ζωή είναι Ωραία.

Βόρεια Κορέα

Λευτεριά στους Έλληνες, εξανα- γκαστικά "Εξαφανισμένους"

 

Μυστικές δίκες;

Trustworthiness

Πολιτισμό, ή, απληστία;

Ακραία Στυγνότητα

Η Τέχνη της Επιβίωσης

Political Asylum 3

Επιστροφή στις ρίζες

The Human Cost of Torture

An urgent appeal for solidarity

More obvious than the Sun

Western "culture"

Political Asylum

Έννομη Προστασία

Μια μήνυση που εγείρει ερωτηματικά

 

 

 

Honor your father...

Noise

Creative Greeks

A pair of Dictatorships

Promptness remains a precondition of Survival, Liberty and Peace PDF Εκτύπωση E-mail
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Συντάχθηκε απο τον/την Χρήστος Μπούμπουλης (Christos Boumpoulis)   
Σάββατο, 22 Ιούλιος 2017 13:15

U234.jpg

 

Promptness remains a precondition of Survival, Liberty and Peace

 

promptness (usually uncountable, plural promptnesses)

  1. The habit or characteristic of doing things without delay.

  2. The habit of adhering to a designated time.

[https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/promptness]

 

We are living in a four dimensional world which is defined by the three dimensional space, plus the time dimension.

Every material form is defined by those four dimensions.

According to John A. Wheeler the “strong” definition of the “Anthropic principle” is that, “the universe has to be such, as to admit life. It is not only that man is adapted to the universe. The universe is adapted to the man”. And also, the “weak” version of the same definition is that, “the universe tends from its outset, organically, in creating conditions of self-awareness, namely, conditions of rational life”.

Life evolves towards, self-awareness and rationality, through, the emergence of manifestations of “needs”, within our four dimensional world.

Consequently, each and every second, in time, is inseparably “intertwined” with a specific, corresponding “need”. And one or more material forms, has to be, at the specific place coordinates and at the specific time coordinate, in order to satisfy this “need”, allowing, by this way, our universe, to evolve creatively.

Promptness, within human life, means, contributing to the positive evolution of the collective life, by being, exactly, at the right place and exactly, at the right time, in order to satisfy the specific “need” which, that specific second of time, “dictates” to our human kind.

By omitting to “meet”, promptly, any of such “needs” we may, passively, negate to the positive evolution of our universe.

Within our everyday lives, being prompt, it is not equally important, at every occasion. However, being prompt in every occasion help us to develop that habit which shall, probably, rescue as, by being prompt, at the most important occasions that demand promptness.

For a negative example, which demonstrates the enormous destructive consequences of not being prompt, the German submarine U-234, during the WW2 was ordered, destructively late, to deliver advanced weapons technology to the Empire of Japan. The U-234 never reached its destination and the WW2 was lost, something which, in fact, lead, our human kind, to the current downfall of the human civilization; to the current downfall of the international law order; to the current, downfall of the human rights; to the current, downfall of democracy; to the current downfall of the national sovereignty; to the current downfall of rationality; to the current downfall of intelligence; to the current downfall of morality; to the evident, worldwide and atrocious, persecution of the legitimate political dissent; the global propagation of, irrational and senseless violence; the “flooding” of the European Continent by an hateful, against, one's own self and all the others, destructive mentality; and to the current and most atrocious of all, global genocide against, all those who resist the devastating, by technical means, of their mentality and all those who resist the instrumental degradation of their existence, to mere material object.

It remains, according to my opinion, impossible, for any of us, to know, in advance and exhaustively, which are going to be all the negative consequences of our, potential, failure to be prompt, at each and every occasion. For this reason, being prompt to each and every, creative and legitimate, occasion, seems the most, rational, productive, civilized and responsible choice that we have.

 

Christos Boumpoulis

economist

 

WORLD WAR II Greatest Mysteries of Hitler's Last U Boat U 234 Full Documentary1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQOs7PKOxDQ

 

German submarine U-234 was a Type XB U-boat of Nazi Germany'sKriegsmarine during World War II. Her first and only mission into enemy or contested territory consisted of the attempted delivery of uranium oxide and German advanced weapons technology to the Empire of Japan. After receiving Admiral Dönitz' order to surface and surrender and of Germany's unconditional surrender, the submarine's crew surrendered to the United States on 14 May 1945.

Wartime service

U-234 returned to the Germaniawerft yard at Kiel on 5 September 1944, to be refitted as a transport. Apart from minor work, she had a snorkel added and 12 of her 30 mineshafts were fitted with special cargo containers the same diameter as the shafts and held in place by the mine release mechanisms. In addition, her keel was loaded with cargo, thought to be optical-grade glass and mercury, and her four upper-deck torpedo storage compartments (two on each side) were also occupied by cargo containers.[3]

Cargo

The cargo to be carried was determined by a special commission, the Marine Sonderdienst Ausland, established towards the end of 1944, at which time the submarine's officers were informed that they were to make a special voyage to Japan. When loading was completed, the submarine's officers estimated that they were carrying 240 tons of cargo plus sufficient diesel fuel and provisions for a six- to nine-month voyage.[3]

The cargo included technical drawings, examples of the newest electric torpedoes, one crated Me 262 jet aircraft, aHenschel Hs 293 glide bomb and what was later listed on the US Unloading Manifest as 550 kg (1,210 lb) of uranium oxide. In the 1997 book Hirschfeld, Wolfgang Hirschfeld reported that he saw about 50 lead cubes with 23 centimetres (9.1 in) sides, and "U-235" painted on each, loaded into the boat's cylindrical mine shafts. According to cable messages sent from the dockyard, these containers held "U-powder".

When the cargo was loaded, U-234 carried out additional trials near Kiel, then returned to the northern German city where her passengers came aboard.

Passengers

U-234 was carrying twelve passengers, including a German general, four German naval officers, civilian engineers and scientists and two Japanese naval officers. The German personnel included General Ulrich Kessler of the Luftwaffe, who was to take over Luftwaffe liaison duties in Tokyo; Kay Nieschling, a Naval Fleet Judge Advocate who was to rid the German diplomatic corps in Japan of the remnants of the Richard Sorge spy ring; Dr. Heinz Schlicke, a specialist in radar, infra-red, and countermeasures and director of the Naval Test Fields in Kiel (later recruited by the USA in Operation Paperclip); and August Bringewalde, who was in charge of Me 262 production at Messerschmitt.

The Japanese passengers were Lieutenant Commander Hideo Tomonaga of the Imperial Japanese Navy, a naval architect and submarine designer who had come to Germany in 1943 on the Japanese submarine I-29, and Lieutenant Commander Shoji Genzo, an aircraft specialist and former naval attaché.

Secret cargo

A classified US intelligence summary written on 19 May listed U-234's cargo as including drawings, arms, medical supplies, instruments, lead, mercury, caffeine, steels, optical glass and brass. The fact that the ship carried .5 short tons (0.45 t) of uranium oxide remained classified for the duration of the Cold War.[9] Author and historian Joseph M. Scalia claimed to have found a formerly secret cable at Portsmouth Navy Yard which stated that the uranium oxide had been stored in gold-lined cylinders rather than cubes as reported by Hirschfeld; the alleged document is discussed in Scalia's book Hitler's Terror Weapons. The exact characteristics of the uranium remain unknown; Scalia and historians Carl Boyd and Akihiko Yoshida have speculated that rather than being weapons-grade material it was instead intended for use as a catalyst in the production of synthetic methanol for aviation fuel.[4]

The 1,200 pounds (540 kg) of uranium disappeared. It was most likely transferred to the Manhattan Project's Oak Ridge diffusion plant. The uranium oxide would have yielded approximately 7.7 pounds (3.5 kg) of U-235 after processing, around 20% of what would have been required to arm a contemporary fission weapon.

Voyage

U-234 sailed from Kiel for Kristiansand in Norway on the evening of 25 March 1945, accompanied by escort vessels and three Type XXIII coastal U-boats, arriving in Horten Naval Base two days later. The submersible spent the next eight days carrying out trials on her snorkel, during which she accidentally collided with a Type VIIC U-boat performing similar trials. Damage to both submarines was minor, and despite a diving and fuel oil tank being holed, U-234 was able to complete her trials. She then proceeded to Kristians and, arriving on about 5 April, where she underwent repairs and topped up her provisions and fuel.

U-234 departed Kristians and for Japan on 15 April 1945, running submerged at snorkel depth for the first 16 days, and surfacing after that only because her commander Kapitänleutnant Johann-Heinrich Fehler, considered he was safe from attack on the surface in the prevailing severe storm. From then on, she spent two hours running on the surface by night, and the remainder of the time submerged. The voyage proceeded without incident; the first sign that world affairs were overtaking the voyage was when the Kriegsmarine's Goliath transmitter stopped transmitting, followed shortly after by the Nauen station. Fehler did not know it, but Germany's naval HQ had fallen into Allied hands.

Then, on 4 May, U-234 received a fragment of a broadcast from British and American radio stations announcing that Admiral Karl Dönitz had become Germany's head of state following the death of Adolf Hitler. U-234 surfaced on 10 May in the interests of better radio reception and received Dönitz's last order to the submarine force, ordering all U-boats to surface, hoist black flags and surrender to Allied forces. Fehler suspected a trick and managed to contact another U-boat (U-873), whose captain convinced him that the message was authentic.

At this point, Fehler was practically equidistant from British, Canadian and American ports. He decided not to continue his journey, and instead headed for the east coast of the United States. Fehler thought it likely that if they surrendered to Canadian or British forces, they would be imprisoned and it could be years before they were returned to Germany; he believed that the US, on the other hand, would probably just send them home.

Fehler consequently decided that he would surrender to US forces, but radioed on 12 May that he intended to sail to Halifax, Nova Scotia to surrender to ensure Canadian units would not reach him first. U-234 then set course for Newport News, Virginia; during the passage Fehler took care to dispose of his Tunis radar detector, the new Kurier radio communication system, and all Enigma related documents and other classified papers.

Capture

The difference between Fehler's reported course to Halifax and his true course was soon realized by US authorities who dispatched two destroyers to intercept U-234. On 14 May 1945 she was encountered south of the Grand Banks, Newfoundland by USS Sutton. Members of Sutton's crew took command of the U-boat and sailed her to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, where U-805, U-873, and U-1228 had already surrendered. Dr. Velma Hunt, a retired Penn State University environmental health professor, has suggested U-234 may have put into two ports between her surrender and her arrival at the Portsmouth Navy Yard: once in Newfoundland, to land an American sailor who had been accidentally shot in the buttocks, and again at Casco Bay, Maine. News of U-234's surrender with her high-ranking German passengers made it a major news event. Reporters swarmed over the Navy Yard and went to sea in a small boat for a look at the submarine.

[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_submarine_U-234]

 

P.S.: This article contains a part of my philosophical opinions. I retain some reservations, with regard to the above video, as, due to my very slow Internet connection, I haven't seen the complete content of this video.

Note: The photo was found here, http://lh5.ggpht.com/-TyhXmXZ0MDo/TigaPgn2enI/AAAAAAAAAAA/p9j8RVhSJ5I/s800/U234.jpg.

 

 

 

Τελευταία Ενημέρωση στις Σάββατο, 22 Ιούλιος 2017 15:20